Princess Eugenie has followed another royal tradition by having her wedding bouquet placed on the Grave of the Unknown Warrior at Westminster Abbey on Saturday, 13 October 2018.

Photo: Westminster Abbey

Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (later Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother) laid hers in memory of her brother Fergus who was killed at the Battle of Loos in 1915 during World War I, as she walked up the aisle sans bouquet.

Photo: Westminster Abbey

Royal brides have continued this tradition by sending their wedding bouquets to Westminster Abbey following their wedding day, including the Duchess of Sussex, in May 2018.

Photo: Westminster Abbey

Patrice Van Helden Oakes created Princess Eugenie’s wedding bouquet with Lily of the Valley, Stephanotis pips, hints of baby blue thistles, white spray roses, trailing ivy and sprigs of myrtle from Osborne House.

Myrtle was first carried in Queen Victoria’s eldest daughter, Victoria Princess Royal, who married Prince Frederik of Prussia (later Emperor Frederick III) in 1858.

Photo: Westminster Abbey

The original myrtle was brought from Germany, when Prince Albert’s grandmother gave Queen Victoria a nosegay, during a visit to Gotha. A sprig was later planted at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, where it continues to thrive today.

Myrtle was used to signify the traditional innocence of a bride.

Photo: Westminster Abbey

Princess Eugenie married Jack Brooksbank at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, on Friday, 12 October 2018, followed by a carriage procession and a reception hosted by Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh.

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