The Royal Court of Sweden has released eight photographs to celebrate Crown Princess Victoria and Prince Daniel’s 10th Wedding Anniversary on 19 June 2020.

Crown Princess Victoria and Prince Daniel outside Gustav III’s pavilion at Haga. Photo: Elisabeth Toll, The Royal Court of Sweden

Photographer Elisabeth Toll took all eight photos at the Gustav III Pavilion in Haga Park, close to the Crown Princess couple’s home at Haga Palace.

Crown Princess Victoria in the Hall of Mirrors. Photo: Elisabeth Toll, The Royal Court of Sweden

A Royal Romance

Crown Princess Victoria chose to marry a commoner and turned him into a Prince.

Crown Princess Victoria and Prince Daniel in the Hall of Mirrors. Prince Daniel. Photo: Elisabeth Toll, The Royal Court of Sweden

They first met in 2001 when Daniel became the Crown Princess’ personal trainer during sessions at the Master Training gym in Stockholm.

Prince Daniel in the Hall of Mirrors.. Photo: Elisabeth Toll, The Royal Court of Sweden

They announced their engagement on Tuesday, 24 February 2009, at the Royal Palace of Stockholm, once her father gave his consent.

Crown Princess Victoria in the Hall of Mirrors. Photo: Elisabeth Toll, The Royal Court of Sweden

The couple chose the 34th Wedding Anniversary of Crown Princess Victoria’s parents for their big day.

Crown Princess Victoria in the Pavilion’s Dining Room. Photo: Elisabeth Toll, The Royal Court of Sweden

Some described Crown Princess Victoria and Daniel Westling’s royal wedding as the biggest in Europe since Prince Charles married Lady Diana Spencer in 1981.

The Wedding

Crown Princess Victoria exchanged vows with Daniel Westling in Stockholm Cathedral on 19 June 2010 with 1,200 guests, including European Royal Families from Denmark, Netherlands, Norway and Belgium.

The newly-married Crown Princess Victoria and Prince Daniel Daniel Westling on 19 June 2010. Photo: Swedish Royal Court

The Australian ambassador, Mr Paul Stephens and his wife, Christina Stephens also attended.

The newlyweds travelled in a carriage procession through Stockholm after the service, before returning to the Royal Palace for the reception.

Gustav III’s Pavilion

Architect Olof Tempelman built the pavilion in the European neoclassical style, with detailed instructions from King Gustav III, who personally became involved in the project.

Prince Daniel in the Pavilion’s Dining Room. Photo: Elisabeth Toll, The Royal Court of Sweden

King Gustav took a keen interest and even suggested a few alterations whilst work was in progress.

Artist Louis Masreliez, who became a trendsetter during the late 18th Century, received the commission to decorate the pavilion’s interior.

Crown Princess Victoria in the Pavilion’s Dining Room. Photo: Elisabeth Toll, The Royal Court of Sweden

Gustav III lived in the pavilion for a few years until he was shot whilst attending that fateful masquerade ball at the Opera House on 16 March 1792. He died from his wounds a couple of weeks later on 29 March.

His government also had plans to colonise Nuyts Land (the south-western coast of Australia) from 1786 to 1787 whilst the British were preparing to send the First Fleet to Botany Bay.

Plans were scrapped when Sweden went to war with Russia in 1788.

Please support Right Royal Roundup by subscribing for only A$10 per month or A$100 per year (with a $20 saving) by clicking on one of the buttons below.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.